Archives pour la catégorie cancertivity

L’habit ne fait pas le malade. Empowering hospital gowns for kids and teens

Who says fashion is superficial? Those who have spent some time in hospitals know that having to wear a blue gown or pyjamas for days or weeks can be quite depressing. But if you are a teenager, the gowns and pyjamas basically mean your social death – I mean, how can you show you’re punk or goth or an activist or a Gryffindor, wearing a piece of blue paper-cloth, that shows your panties?! That’s why I’m completely in love with these two initiatives, that design very stylish and empowering hospital gowns! Lire la suite L’habit ne fait pas le malade. Empowering hospital gowns for kids and teens

Rebuilding yourself through art // SKIN, l’association qui encourage les (ex)malades à chanter leur « cancer blues » et à sculpter leur nouveau « moi ».

On m’avait avertie que l’après-cancer serait difficile. On m’avait parlé du « cancer blues », de la difficulté des personnes en rémission à reprendre la cadence d’une vie qui n’est plus rythmée par les rendez-vous médicaux. On m’avait parlé de la solitude des ex-patients face à leurs peurs de rechute… Mais on ne m’avait pas dit, qu’il y a des jours où on est tellement perdue qu’on regrette le temps des traitements, non pas parce que c’était tellement gai d’avoir des nausées, mais parce que pendant les traitements, on savait ce qu’on voulait (guérir) et qui on était (une malade/fighteuse). On ne m’avait pas dit, qu’il y a des nuits où on se sent tellement lasse de la vie qu’on craint le matin à venir et qu’à ce mal-être s’ajoute immédiatement la culpabilité de se plaindre alors qu’on est vivante. On ne m’avait pas dit, qu’il y a des moments où on attend impatiemment les rendez-vous de contrôle avec l’oncologue, non pas pour qu’elle nous rassure, mais pour qu’elle nous prescrive des antidépresseurs. Et on ne m’avait surtout pas dit, que tout ça c’était normal. Lire la suite Rebuilding yourself through art // SKIN, l’association qui encourage les (ex)malades à chanter leur « cancer blues » et à sculpter leur nouveau « moi ».

Iridescence – The power of creativity

Presque un an jour pour jour après ma dernière séance de chimiothérapie, je remercie de tout coeur toutes les personnes -amis, famille, et d’innombrables inconnus- qui m’ont soutenue dans cette période difficile à travers leur présence, leurs pensées et leurs prières. Voilà, cette vidéo est pour vous. c’est cadeau;)

One year after my last chemotherapy, I warmly thank the many people -friends, family and strangers- that supported me throughout that difficult period of my life, sending prayers, love and good energy. This video is for you!:)

Depuis qu’ils ne ressemblent plus à rien, ils ont décidé de ne ressembler à personne! Today they’ll be different!

what if chemo was the perfect time for a change of style?;)

thank you eileen for the link:)

Ps: évidemment, ce n’est pas parce qu’on n’a plus de cheveux, qu’on ne ressemble à rien! J’avais prévu ce jeu de mots pour un article me concernant et n’engageant donc que ma petite personne, mais vu que entretemps j’ai de nouveau des cheveux (et des cils et des sourcils -oui,oui) et que j’espère les garder, je l’utilise ici. Donc, pour éviter tout malentendu, voici un message aux participants de l’expérience: vous êtes beaux! (avec et sans déguisement)

Cou-Rage. Une designer met des mots sur ses blessures.

The doctors recently discovered that the many little strokes that I had during my treatment were caused by a medical error. At first, I was relieved, then, -when I realized I was lucky that the medical error didn’t kill or handicapped me-, I felt utterly grateful. Of course, I was a little bit upset too (I spent nearly 50 days in the hospital over the last ten months, I had to eat horrible hospital food, I still have attention problems, I missed my mom’s last birthday and a workshop with Desmond Richardson (!) because of a f*** medical error!!), but I tried to ignore that unpleasant feeling – in the end, all is well that ends well, and, who can claim he has never made an error?

But that was before I had seen Trix Barmettlers poster. The poster shows a woman’s torso with a mastectomy scar. It is covered by three  letters, that either form the word “Mut” (courage) or the word « Wut » (anger) depending on how you read it.

(c) Trix Barmettler
« Mutwut. A designer loses her objectivity. »

Lire la suite Cou-Rage. Une designer met des mots sur ses blessures.

Tout est dans la tête. Ou plutôt, dessus./ How (fake) head tattoos sometimes help to draw yourself up.

In olden days African hairstyles worked as indicators for a person’s rank, age class, ethnic group or marital status. When I still had hair, I had my very own hair semiology: one hairstyle = one role.

Afro:                               Angela Davis: free, rebel and disalienated
French pleat:               the businesswoman –determined and successful
Ballerina bun:             the classical dancer: romantic and dreamy
Ponytail:                       the jogger – active, but easygoing
Braids:                           the Congolese – back to the roots
Updo:                             the 50’s jazz singer –elegant and feminine
High front bun:          the teacher – having a natural authority (or at least I hope so. I wore it to impress my students…)

I didn’t care that I had never jogged in my life, the simple fact of wearing a ponytail in the morning made me feel more energetic and gave me the illusion that I potentially could be the next marathon winner. But chemo suddenly ended this “autosuggestion-by-hairstyles”-method. Being bold, I can only play one single role: the one of the cancer patient: sick and weak. (well, and the one of the neo-nazi, but I don’t think my skin tone would fit…)

But that was before I discovered that eyeliners work pretty well on bald heads. Now, every time I go out in the evening, I draw flowers or abstract figures on my head. Not only are they beautiful, they also hide the fact that my hair-loss is due to chemo!

(c)lescellulescreatives.net

Lire la suite Tout est dans la tête. Ou plutôt, dessus./ How (fake) head tattoos sometimes help to draw yourself up.